Equality & Diversity and Safeguarding

Equality and Diversity



At North Shropshire College we are committed to ensuring that every student has an equal opportunity to succeed.

We make sure that everything we do helps:

  • Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment, victimisation and any other conduct prohibited by the Equality Act 2010;

  • Advance the equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and people who do not share it;

  • Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and people who do not share it.



Single Equality Duty


North Shropshire College will encourage and support students and staff to challenge prejudice, stereotyping and intolerance, and will manage its policies, procedures and environment in ways that will seek to maintain every individual’s dignity and rights.

North Shropshire College, ‘Single Equality Scheme’ sets out how the College will promote equality of opportunity regardless of race, gender, disability, age, faith or sexual orientation, in both the delivery of its services and the employment of its staff.



You can find out more information about our commitment to equality and diversity and how we meet the requirements of the Equality Duty in our Equality & Diversity Report 2015-16.




Equality Objectives



  • Recruit and maintain a staff and student population which is reflective of the local and wider community.

  • Ensure that the recruitment of learners and staff is based on the principle of inclusivity with reasonable adjustments made where necessary.

  • Ensure employers providing Work Based Learning or placement opportunities are aware of their legal responsibilities and are encouraged to actively promote equality and diversity.

  • Ensure that all learning and training programmes reflect and promote equality and diversity in content and delivery in a manner that is appropriate.

  • To provide learner support services which are inclusive and take proactive steps to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations among all groups of people.

  • Ensure staff and learners are protected from discrimination, harassment or bullying and take appropriate and timely action when non-compliance with the policy is identified.

  • Seek the views of all those who use the services of the College and respond to their needs.

  • Monitor, evaluate, review and publish progress on a regular basis to close the equalities gap and actively promote equality of opportunity across all the protected characteristics.



Safeguarding



The policy covers abuse and neglect, prevention of bullying, harassment and discrimination, dealing with attendance issues and meeting the needs of sick students and security.

If you, as a student here, have any concern about your wellbeing, safety or rights, then you should:

  • Talk to your tutor

  • Talk to staff based in Learner Services


We treat all our students with the respect they deserve. And we expect our students to show the maturity and responsibility of adults when they are at North Shropshire College. You can download our Safeguarding Policy and our Early Help Offer documents here.






Prevent



Prevent is one of four strands of the Government’s counter terrorism strategy – CONTEST.  The UK currently faces a range of terrorist threats.  Terrorist groups who pose a threat to the UK seek to radicalise and recruit people to their cause.  Therefore early intervention is at the heart of Prevent, which aims to divert people away from being drawn into terrorist activity. 
Prevent happens before any criminal activity takes place by recognising, supporting and protecting people who might be susceptible to radicalisation.
 
The national Prevent Duty confers mandatory duties and responsibilities on a range of public organisations, including Further Education Colleges. For further information about our Prevent Policy, you can download it here

Are you e-safe? - 3 Cs of e-Safety




Contact



Contact can be made via the Internet easily and it can mean that people have access to groups they would not normally have access to.

  • How you appear on the web may affect your future employment.

  • Did you know that you can get or lose jobs because of postings on Twitter or Facebook?

  • If you feel unsure about the contact that has been made via the Internet please report the person either to the police, a parent, a tutor, or someone who can help you. If the contact is made via a social networking site such as Facebook, Ask.fm, Tumblr or LinkedIn, you can report the user via the website.

  • Do not publish personal details or financial details online.

  • Regularly change your usernames and password. Don’t share them with anyone. A mix of letters and numbers in a password adds security; such a password may look like the following; Just4aDay1 or IdRolloutofBed2

  • Set your profiles to private (usually under settings). You won’t then be found on Google. Do not put your name, address and date of birth on any of these sites, as this makes identity theft easier. Consider if your friends are really friends, people you know who won’t use anything you post to your disadvantage.

  • Chat rooms. Beware of giving information that criminals might use e.g. address and or when you will be away on holiday.


Content



These are risks such as online gambling, inappropriate advertising and financial scams.

  • Beware of “Phishing” and or financial scams. If you think you are at risk, please report it to the Anti–Phishing Working Group

  • Your bank/government/tax office would never contact you via email to ask for information.

  • Censor yourself online. Consider what a future employer might think of your postings. As an employer would you consider interviewing someone with the email address ‘fluffypinkbunny@hotmail.com’.

  • Google your name with speech marks to see your digital footprint e.g. “Sarah Matthews”. Review the first page of hits. Remember your digital identity is also what other people have written about you. If you have a common name, it is unlikely the person you see won’t be you. If someone else has written negatively about you, you may want to contact them to ask them to remove their posting.


Conduct



This covers activities carried out by someone, which is deliberately meant to upset someone.



  • This could be via a social networking site, a website or mobile phone.

  • Beware of cyberbullies, if you feel you are being bullied please talk to a tutor or someone you can trust.

  • If you believe upsetting information about someone/some thing (including the college or tutors within the College) are being published or inappropriate activities are occurring please report them to a tutor, staff member or a parent.



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